Agreement Italian Translation

Of these, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Belgium, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco and Switzerland are type 1, as they have English, German or French as their official language and therefore do not need a translation of the specifications for the validation of the patent in their country. In the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Denmark, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, Switzerland, Hungary, Iceland, Latvia, the Netherlands, Slovenia and Sweden, the new provisions of the London Agreement apply in such situations, reducing the translation requirements of the amended issue. Get accurate translations of legal documents related to owning or renting real estate anywhere in the world. These countries no longer need a translation of the specification to validate the patent granted in that country. The signing of the London Agreement is optional. For countries that do not show up, the current law is maintained, i.e. they can require the translation of the entire patent specification into their national language in order for the patent to be effective in their country. Allowance – Translation of claims into French and German. Upon issuance – translation of all the specifications into German (for Austria). Cost savings – none, because the translation of the entire specification into German is still necessary. As is the case so far, the authorization of an application always requires the translation of the claims into French and German before issuance (provided that the application is written in English). Method: Intercultural validation required a back-and-forth translation of RCS-E, review by a committee of experts and its application in intensive rehabilitation through retrospective collection of data from clinical recordings.

Psychometric properties were assessed by analysing correlations between rcs-E-Score and other measures (Functional Independence Measure, Braden, Morse, Cumulative Illness Rating Scale) and assessing reliability in terms of reproducibility (Inter-Observer Agreement) and repeatability (Intra-Observer Agreement). These countries choose one of these three languages (English, French or German) and only need a translation of the specification into the selected language (provided that the patent has not been granted in that language). They may request the translation of claims into their national language. Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, Croatia, Sweden and Macedonia are type 2, as they do not have English, French or German as their official language. Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Iceland, the Netherlands, Norway, Croatia and Sweden have chosen English as the language of translation, but require the translation of claims into their national language. Macedonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Slovenia have not chosen a specific language, but need a new translation of the claims into their national language. Albania does not require the translation of claims or specifications. Allocation – translation of claims into French and German. In case of issuance, no further translation is necessary. When an application is accepted, it is necessary to file a translation of the claims into French and German (provided that the application is in English). The London agreement has not changed. After grant, most Member States of the European Patent Convention (EPC) required the filing of a translation of the entire specification into the national language of the State, so that the patent could enter into force in that State.

The preparation of these necessary translations could represent up to about 40% of the total cost of obtaining a European patent. There is no better place to benefit from legal translation services..



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